rhu: (Default)
2013-01-13 08:51 pm
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Genealogy: Ermreuther

I haven't had much time to blog for the last few months, and the next few months will also probably be spotty.

You may recall that my last several posts were about my maternal grandmother's family. I wrote about her father, Hermann Friedmann: From research that others have done, I know that his parents were Jonas Friedmann and Babette Ermanreuther, but I do not know anything beyond that about his family.Read more... )
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2012-11-27 09:10 pm
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Update to the Erlanger family post

This week's posting is an update on my previous one. Cut for length )
rhu: (Default)
2012-11-12 06:50 pm
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Addendum to the Friedmann genealogy

I forgot to include some "supporting evidence" in last night's post. Big pictures behind the cut )
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2012-11-11 09:47 pm
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Chapter 2: The Friedmanns and (the recent generations of) the Erlangers

We're going to switch over to my mom's side of the family now. And to keep things symmetric, since we started with my father's father, we'll start with my mother's mother, born Frieda Friedmann on 21 May 1911 in Nurenberg. Continued behind the cut for length )
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2012-11-09 12:45 pm
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Kristallnacht

Today is the anniversary of "Kristallnacht". That, of course, was the Nazi's name for the pogrom that, for many, marks the beginning of the Holocaust.

I'm going to post three images. The first is a paragraph from my grandfather's "book". The second is a document from Dachau. The third is a photograph. I will translate the German as best as I can.Behind a cut-tag because of the pictures )

May his memory be a blessing.
rhu: (Default)
2012-11-04 10:17 pm
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Geneaology Chapter 1 part 3 (4?): The rest of the Greene story

In this installment, we'll look at what happened to Ida and Barnett's children. For clarity, I'll tell each one's story in birth order. As usual, cut for length and pictures )

Next time, we'll set my father's lineage aside for a while and take up the story of my mother's family.
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2012-10-28 08:14 am
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Interlude: Genealogical methods: a case study

A brief interlude on methodology. I found something mildly interesting last night; this post is about how I tracked it down. It was a chance to combine tools from four different websites and is a great example of how this sort of genealogical research is a lot like solving a puzzle. Long and with pictures, as usual. )
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-28 08:14 am
Entry tags:

Interlude: Genealogical methods: a case study

A brief interlude on methodology. I found something mildly interesting last night; this post is about how I tracked it down. It was a chance to combine tools from four different websites and is a great example of how this sort of genealogical research is a lot like solving a puzzle. Long and with pictures, as usual. )
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-27 10:34 pm
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Chapter 1, part 2: The Greenes in America, 1900-1919

This week's post will continue the story of the Greenes, my paternal grandfather's nuclear family, bringing it up to the passing of Barnett and Ida. Long, with pictures )
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-27 10:34 pm
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Chapter 1, part 2: The Greenes in America, 1900-1919

This week's post will continue the story of the Greenes, my paternal grandfather's nuclear family, bringing it up to the passing of Barnett and Ida. Long, with pictures )
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2012-10-21 02:49 pm
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Chapter 1, part 1: The Greenes in America, 1887-1915

Since my initial goal was producing the book for my nephew, my first focus was on areas where I didn't have already have a lot of information. Long and with lots of images )
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-21 02:49 pm
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Chapter 1, part 1: The Greenes in America, 1887-1915

Since my initial goal was producing the book for my nephew, my first focus was on areas where I didn't have already have a lot of information. Long and with lots of images )
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-14 10:23 pm
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Genealogy, part 0

So before I start talking about the research that I did, I should start by introducing you to the names that I knew when I started. Behind a cut for length )

Returning close to home: I have one sister; both she and I have one son and one daughter. My mother is an only child; my father's brother also has two children. So growing up, I thought that, with the exception of the Erlanger branch, which was reserved for special occasions like weddings and reunions, our family was small.

It turns out I was wrong.
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-14 10:23 pm
Entry tags:

Genealogy, part 0

So before I start talking about the research that I did, I should start by introducing you to the names that I knew when I started. Behind a cut for length )

Returning close to home: I have one sister; both she and I have one son and one daughter. My mother is an only child; my father's brother also has two children. So growing up, I thought that, with the exception of the Erlanger branch, which was reserved for special occasions like weddings and reunions, our family was small.

It turns out I was wrong.
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-13 11:12 pm
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Intro to Genealogy posts

A few months ago, I was puzzling over what to give my nephew as a bar mitzvah present. I wanted it to be meaningful, both now and later in his life.

Around the same time, I heard that those whose grandparents' German citizenship had been stripped in 1941 because they were Jewish could apply to have it restored. My mom still has all her parents' paperwork, and when I got to their "Certificate of Identity in lieu of passport for stateless persons", issues by the British government and stamped by the US with my grandparents' immigration visa lottery numbers, I knew exactly what my nephew's present would be.

I threw myself into a genealogical research project. My goal was to create a "photobook" of our family's history, telling the story with primary documentation as much as I could.

What I found amazed me. And even after I finished the book, I couldn't stop, because I kept finding more and more.

Sometimes, what I found was raw data -- names, dates, places. Sometimes, what I found was narrative -- the stories behind the raw data. And sometimes, what I found was a cousin from a branch of the family that we'd lost touch with. That was the most gratifying of all.

I intend to start writing up this experience in my blog. I think all of these types of narratives are interesting -- not only my family's story, and the story of making new connections, but also the nuts-and-bolts of how I applied the talents and techniques of a Mystery Hunt solver to a different kind of puzzle. (For what it's worth, I haven't done a crossword puzzle since mid-July.)

(If you're one of my relatives, don't worry -- I plan to preserve your privacy, except in those cases where you already have a highly visible online presence.)
rhu: (Default)
2012-10-13 11:12 pm
Entry tags:

Intro to Genealogy posts

A few months ago, I was puzzling over what to give my nephew as a bar mitzvah present. I wanted it to be meaningful, both now and later in his life.

Around the same time, I heard that those whose grandparents' German citizenship had been stripped in 1941 because they were Jewish could apply to have it restored. My mom still has all her parents' paperwork, and when I got to their "Certificate of Identity in lieu of passport for stateless persons", issues by the British government and stamped by the US with my grandparents' immigration visa lottery numbers, I knew exactly what my nephew's present would be.

I threw myself into a genealogical research project. My goal was to create a "photobook" of our family's history, telling the story with primary documentation as much as I could.

What I found amazed me. And even after I finished the book, I couldn't stop, because I kept finding more and more.

Sometimes, what I found was raw data -- names, dates, places. Sometimes, what I found was narrative -- the stories behind the raw data. And sometimes, what I found was a cousin from a branch of the family that we'd lost touch with. That was the most gratifying of all.

I intend to start writing up this experience in my blog. I think all of these types of narratives are interesting -- not only my family's story, and the story of making new connections, but also the nuts-and-bolts of how I applied the talents and techniques of a Mystery Hunt solver to a different kind of puzzle. (For what it's worth, I haven't done a crossword puzzle since mid-July.)

(If you're one of my relatives, don't worry -- I plan to preserve your privacy, except in those cases where you already have a highly visible online presence.)
rhu: (Default)
2012-09-26 09:47 pm
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Another genealogical find

I found myself wondering: The stamp in my great-grandfather's machzor says "M. H. Bissinger -- Cigarren & Wein -- Ichenhausen". But we only ever knew his name as "Max". What did the H stand for?

Well, I've been doing all this genealogical research lately, right? And just the other day I found this awesome database at http://jgbs.org/ with lots of facsimile records from Bavarian Swabia, with many records (including all the ones from Ichenhausen) indexed. So tonight I looked him up; his birth record just says "Max Bissinger" but his marriage record says "Max Heinrich L Bissinger".

The Internet is an amazing place.
rhu: (Default)
2012-09-26 09:47 pm
Entry tags:

Another genealogical find

I found myself wondering: The stamp in my great-grandfather's machzor says "M. H. Bissinger -- Cigarren & Wein -- Ichenhausen". But we only ever knew his name as "Max". What did the H stand for?

Well, I've been doing all this genealogical research lately, right? And just the other day I found this awesome database at http://jgbs.org/ with lots of facsimile records from Bavarian Swabia, with many records (including all the ones from Ichenhausen) indexed. So tonight I looked him up; his birth record just says "Max Bissinger" but his marriage record says "Max Heinrich L Bissinger".

The Internet is an amazing place.
rhu: (Default)
2012-09-02 08:09 pm
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Where I come from

Yesterday, my nephew celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah. I had decided earlier this summer that a meaningful gift would be a book documenting our shared family roots.

Some of this was easy: my mom had many records from her parents, for example. Some has been challenging but rewarding research. I have found living cousins I never knew existed; I have found gravesites of ancestors whose lives were almost lost to the currents of time.

I haven't been able to blog about these discoveries as they've happened, because I wanted to keep this a surprise. But today I gave Josh his book, and I brought an extra copy of it and of all my primary sources to share with our relatives. I have some great stories to share, and now I have some more clues. I plan to write up both my ancestors' stories and the stories of my research and post them to this blog after the holidays.
rhu: (Default)
2012-09-02 08:09 pm
Entry tags:

Where I come from

Yesterday, my nephew celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah. I had decided earlier this summer that a meaningful gift would be a book documenting our shared family roots.

Some of this was easy: my mom had many records from her parents, for example. Some has been challenging but rewarding research. I have found living cousins I never knew existed; I have found gravesites of ancestors whose lives were almost lost to the currents of time.

I haven't been able to blog about these discoveries as they've happened, because I wanted to keep this a surprise. But today I gave Josh his book, and I brought an extra copy of it and of all my primary sources to share with our relatives. I have some great stories to share, and now I have some more clues. I plan to write up both my ancestors' stories and the stories of my research and post them to this blog after the holidays.