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I finally got a smartphone. It's an LG Thrive (which is AT&T's branding of the Optimus) on a pay-per-use plan. (Yes, with regrets I'm leaving Virgin Mobile for AT&T, because AT&T is the first to offer pay-as-you-go for data.)

My new phone runs Android 2.2 ("Froyo"). Initial reactions behind the cut )
rhu: (Default)
I finally got a smartphone. It's an LG Thrive (which is AT&T's branding of the Optimus) on a pay-per-use plan. (Yes, with regrets I'm leaving Virgin Mobile for AT&T, because AT&T is the first to offer pay-as-you-go for data.)

My new phone runs Android 2.2 ("Froyo"). Initial reactions behind the cut )
rhu: (Default)
Anyone else remember when "Take your daughter to work day" was all about making sure girls realized that they could grow up to do the same jobs that boys would?

And then somewhere along the way someone decided that this was "sexist" and it became "Take your children to work day", which largely defeated the point?

Well, I think the remaining point has been squished as well. Last week, my office marked "take your children to work day" by having a late-afternoon minigolf and pizza party for anyone who wanted to bring their children by after school so that they could, well, play minigolf and eat pizza. Because, of course, that's what we do in the office.
rhu: (Default)
Anyone else remember when "Take your daughter to work day" was all about making sure girls realized that they could grow up to do the same jobs that boys would?

And then somewhere along the way someone decided that this was "sexist" and it became "Take your children to work day", which largely defeated the point?

Well, I think the remaining point has been squished as well. Last week, my office marked "take your children to work day" by having a late-afternoon minigolf and pizza party for anyone who wanted to bring their children by after school so that they could, well, play minigolf and eat pizza. Because, of course, that's what we do in the office.
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"Doc" by Mary Doria Russell is a fictionalized account of the time spent by Doc Holliday in Dodge City, where he first met and befriended Wyatt Earp. I found this book deeply disappointing.

Long review behind the cut. )

Disclaimer: This review is based on an advance reader copy provided gratis by Random House through LibraryThing's "Early Reviewers" program.
rhu: (Default)
"Doc" by Mary Doria Russell is a fictionalized account of the time spent by Doc Holliday in Dodge City, where he first met and befriended Wyatt Earp. I found this book deeply disappointing.

Long review behind the cut. )

Disclaimer: This review is based on an advance reader copy provided gratis by Random House through LibraryThing's "Early Reviewers" program.
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Yesterday, we took the kids to the exhibit "1001 Inventions" at the New York Hall of Science. It was horrible. It wasn't really about inventions, and certainly not about 1001 of them. It was propaganda about the Islamic contributions to science and technology during the European "Dark Ages."

Cut for length )
rhu: (Default)
Yesterday, we took the kids to the exhibit "1001 Inventions" at the New York Hall of Science. It was horrible. It wasn't really about inventions, and certainly not about 1001 of them. It was propaganda about the Islamic contributions to science and technology during the European "Dark Ages."

Cut for length )
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Heather and I went to one of those moving-picture thingies tonight and saw "The King's Speech." We enjoyed it, and no one out there really needs another review, but I just wanted to register that the music for this film was absolutely horrid. The inconsistent use of the Mozart was bad enough, the original music was overwrought, but when the British King is addressing the nation at the start of World War II, is it really the best choice to underscore with Beethoven, a German composer?
rhu: (Default)
Heather and I went to one of those moving-picture thingies tonight and saw "The King's Speech." We enjoyed it, and no one out there really needs another review, but I just wanted to register that the music for this film was absolutely horrid. The inconsistent use of the Mozart was bad enough, the original music was overwrought, but when the British King is addressing the nation at the start of World War II, is it really the best choice to underscore with Beethoven, a German composer?
rhu: (Default)
Yesterday, WCRB played Beethoven's Third as part of their programming in honor of MLK Day. The host explained the connection, that the Eroica was dedicated "to the memory of a great man."

But the way I learned the history, the dedication was meant ironically. Beethoven had originally written it to honor Napoleon Boonaparte, but before the work was premiered Beethoven was disgusted by what he saw as Napoleon's betrayal of the moral principles of the French Revolution, and he tore up the dedication page and rewrote it as "to the memory of a great man" --- not because Napoleon was dead, but that he was no longer a great man, and Beethoven was mourning his moral downfall.

I'd expect more knowledge of basic music history from a classical music station, especially one that's part of the WGBH family.
rhu: (Default)
Yesterday, WCRB played Beethoven's Third as part of their programming in honor of MLK Day. The host explained the connection, that the Eroica was dedicated "to the memory of a great man."

But the way I learned the history, the dedication was meant ironically. Beethoven had originally written it to honor Napoleon Boonaparte, but before the work was premiered Beethoven was disgusted by what he saw as Napoleon's betrayal of the moral principles of the French Revolution, and he tore up the dedication page and rewrote it as "to the memory of a great man" --- not because Napoleon was dead, but that he was no longer a great man, and Beethoven was mourning his moral downfall.

I'd expect more knowledge of basic music history from a classical music station, especially one that's part of the WGBH family.
rhu: (Default)
Got Sondheim's "Finishing the Hat" out of the library. Although it's dauntingly large, most of it is lyrics --- which are great for reference but for the most part can be skimmed in order to get to the Good Parts. And the Good Parts are very good indeed; there were quite a few great laughs, and an understanding of how Sondheim writes and, more importantly, how he hears.

Cut for length; the rest of the Sondheim review and more on Moynihan behind the cut )
rhu: (Default)
Got Sondheim's "Finishing the Hat" out of the library. Although it's dauntingly large, most of it is lyrics --- which are great for reference but for the most part can be skimmed in order to get to the Good Parts. And the Good Parts are very good indeed; there were quite a few great laughs, and an understanding of how Sondheim writes and, more importantly, how he hears.

Cut for length; the rest of the Sondheim review and more on Moynihan behind the cut )

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Andrew M. Greene

January 2013

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