rhu: (Default)
H and I went to see The Pirates of Penzance last night. This is a one-weekend limited-run at the ART's Club Oberon in Harvard Square; the production is by a Chicago group called The Hypocrites. We had a blast, and highly recommend it, although only if you already know Pirates.

Lengthy review behind cut )

This never quite slid into parody, although it was firmly in the camp camp. I laughed very hard, and was thoroughly entertained. I don't know if tickets are still available for the rest of this run, but if you get a chance to see this, and if you're already a G and S fan, I recommend it.
rhu: (Default)
H and I went to see The Pirates of Penzance last night. This is a one-weekend limited-run at the ART's Club Oberon in Harvard Square; the production is by a Chicago group called The Hypocrites. We had a blast, and highly recommend it, although only if you already know Pirates.

Lengthy review behind cut )

This never quite slid into parody, although it was firmly in the camp camp. I laughed very hard, and was thoroughly entertained. I don't know if tickets are still available for the rest of this run, but if you get a chance to see this, and if you're already a G and S fan, I recommend it.
rhu: (Default)

The Executive Summary

Please help me choose whether to enter a music competition, and which pieces to submit. Details behind the cut. )

Thanks!

rhu: (Default)

The Executive Summary

Please help me choose whether to enter a music competition, and which pieces to submit. Details behind the cut. )

Thanks!

rhu: (torah)
Last night at our shul we had the first meeting of an experimental minyan. The gist of it was that we were going to have a kabbalat shabbat service using choral settings of Carlebach and Lewandowski melodies, but with the entire community functioning as the chorus. (I.e., this was participatory, not performer-audience.) Our leaders (both shul members) were Josh Jacobson, founder and artistic director of the Zamir Chorale of Boston, and Daniel Jackson.

Cut for length )
rhu: (torah)
Last night at our shul we had the first meeting of an experimental minyan. The gist of it was that we were going to have a kabbalat shabbat service using choral settings of Carlebach and Lewandowski melodies, but with the entire community functioning as the chorus. (I.e., this was participatory, not performer-audience.) Our leaders (both shul members) were Josh Jacobson, founder and artistic director of the Zamir Chorale of Boston, and Daniel Jackson.

Cut for length )

Psalm 136

Mar. 31st, 2011 11:07 pm
rhu: (torah)
Tomorrow is Shabbat Ha-Chodesh, which means that Pesach is in a few weeks, and I've been meaning to post this for years.

Psalm 136 occurs in the middle of the Hallel (Psalms of Praise) section of the seder. Since there aren't a lot of tunes for it, many people find it boring and I even know many who skip it. In 1996, I wrote a setting of it for my Pesukei d'Zimrah, and it works great as a responsive sing-along at the seder table, too.

Three years ago, I posted the basic sheet music, but what I've really wanted to do was post a recording of it. Tonight I made such a recording, in two formats: solo vocal a cappella, as we sing it at our seder (except that everyone sings along on the "Ki Leolam Chasdo" parts), and for context, the setting for orchestra and chorus. The latter is useful if you can use your imagination to overcome the facts that (1) it's a simulated orchestra and that I am not (2) a soprano, (3) an alto, (4) a tenor, (5) sufficiently rehearsed, nor (6) warmed up.

I hope many of you will find this melody inspirational, fun, and a worthwhile addition to your sedarim.

Psalm 136

Mar. 31st, 2011 11:07 pm
rhu: (torah)
Tomorrow is Shabbat Ha-Chodesh, which means that Pesach is in a few weeks, and I've been meaning to post this for years.

Psalm 136 occurs in the middle of the Hallel (Psalms of Praise) section of the seder. Since there aren't a lot of tunes for it, many people find it boring and I even know many who skip it. In 1996, I wrote a setting of it for my Pesukei d'Zimrah, and it works great as a responsive sing-along at the seder table, too.

Three years ago, I posted the basic sheet music, but what I've really wanted to do was post a recording of it. Tonight I made such a recording, in two formats: solo vocal a cappella, as we sing it at our seder (except that everyone sings along on the "Ki Leolam Chasdo" parts), and for context, the setting for orchestra and chorus. The latter is useful if you can use your imagination to overcome the facts that (1) it's a simulated orchestra and that I am not (2) a soprano, (3) an alto, (4) a tenor, (5) sufficiently rehearsed, nor (6) warmed up.

I hope many of you will find this melody inspirational, fun, and a worthwhile addition to your sedarim.
rhu: (Default)
Yesterday, WCRB played Beethoven's Third as part of their programming in honor of MLK Day. The host explained the connection, that the Eroica was dedicated "to the memory of a great man."

But the way I learned the history, the dedication was meant ironically. Beethoven had originally written it to honor Napoleon Boonaparte, but before the work was premiered Beethoven was disgusted by what he saw as Napoleon's betrayal of the moral principles of the French Revolution, and he tore up the dedication page and rewrote it as "to the memory of a great man" --- not because Napoleon was dead, but that he was no longer a great man, and Beethoven was mourning his moral downfall.

I'd expect more knowledge of basic music history from a classical music station, especially one that's part of the WGBH family.
rhu: (Default)
Yesterday, WCRB played Beethoven's Third as part of their programming in honor of MLK Day. The host explained the connection, that the Eroica was dedicated "to the memory of a great man."

But the way I learned the history, the dedication was meant ironically. Beethoven had originally written it to honor Napoleon Boonaparte, but before the work was premiered Beethoven was disgusted by what he saw as Napoleon's betrayal of the moral principles of the French Revolution, and he tore up the dedication page and rewrote it as "to the memory of a great man" --- not because Napoleon was dead, but that he was no longer a great man, and Beethoven was mourning his moral downfall.

I'd expect more knowledge of basic music history from a classical music station, especially one that's part of the WGBH family.
rhu: (torah)
Very rough -- and normally I wouldn't post something this rough -- but Chanukah starts in less than 24 hours, and I'd like some feedback.

My first posting in this blog, five years ago, was about how most Jews who sing Maoz Tsur on Chanukah sing the wrong stanza. Well, over Thanksgiving weekend I started mulling over Yevanim Nikb'tzu Alai; Sunday night I wrote out what I had; and tonight I multitracked it. (I <3 my Zoom H4!)

So it's a rush job --- or, to be generous, it's a first draft. I didn't rehearse, so there are spots where the harmonies are missing, wrong, or even in one spot a complete train wreck. And there are spots where it needs editing. On the other hand, I just wrote and recorded a song in a few grabbed hours over a two-day period, and how cool is that?

So anyway, here it is (MP3, 2MB, 2min). What do you think?
rhu: (torah)
Very rough -- and normally I wouldn't post something this rough -- but Chanukah starts in less than 24 hours, and I'd like some feedback.

My first posting in this blog, five years ago, was about how most Jews who sing Maoz Tsur on Chanukah sing the wrong stanza. Well, over Thanksgiving weekend I started mulling over Yevanim Nikb'tzu Alai; Sunday night I wrote out what I had; and tonight I multitracked it. (I <3 my Zoom H4!)

So it's a rush job --- or, to be generous, it's a first draft. I didn't rehearse, so there are spots where the harmonies are missing, wrong, or even in one spot a complete train wreck. And there are spots where it needs editing. On the other hand, I just wrote and recorded a song in a few grabbed hours over a two-day period, and how cool is that?

So anyway, here it is (MP3, 2MB, 2min). What do you think?

V

Aug. 11th, 2010 10:52 pm
rhu: (Default)
Had a lovely evening at the Esplanade enjoying the Boston Landmarks Orchestra concert (and the company of good friends).

My review of their performance of Beethoven's Seventh behind the cut )

Overall, an inspiring concert. Next week, the fourth and Rhapsody in Blue. Don't miss it, if you can help it!

V

Aug. 11th, 2010 10:52 pm
rhu: (Default)
Had a lovely evening at the Esplanade enjoying the Boston Landmarks Orchestra concert (and the company of good friends).

My review of their performance of Beethoven's Seventh behind the cut )

Overall, an inspiring concert. Next week, the fourth and Rhapsody in Blue. Don't miss it, if you can help it!
rhu: (Default)
I just finished my editing pass on L'cha Dodi, the longest of the movements of my setting of Kabbalat Shabbat. I have generated all the PDFs and MP3s, including all sixty part-prominent rehearsal MP3s.

I hereby declare the composition phase of this project complete! I have finished one of my open projects! D'you hear me? IT'S DONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Next up: Recording a sestet; I have most of the singers lined up for that and intend for it to happen in June.
rhu: (Default)
I just finished my editing pass on L'cha Dodi, the longest of the movements of my setting of Kabbalat Shabbat. I have generated all the PDFs and MP3s, including all sixty part-prominent rehearsal MP3s.

I hereby declare the composition phase of this project complete! I have finished one of my open projects! D'you hear me? IT'S DONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Next up: Recording a sestet; I have most of the singers lined up for that and intend for it to happen in June.
rhu: (Default)
I just uploaded the latest files to the KabShab website. All movements have reached my second milestone!

This means that all ten movements have been broken out into six voices with lyrics properly assigned. What remains: a couple of simple editorial tasks (make sure dynamics and tempi are correctly notated, and that all lyrics are using the same font) and a pass to check the singability of each part (change that it's in range, has no awkward jumps, and that the syllables of the lyrics fall reasonably in the contrapuntal sections).

Let's hear it for long weekends! :-)
rhu: (Default)
I just uploaded the latest files to the KabShab website. All movements have reached my second milestone!

This means that all ten movements have been broken out into six voices with lyrics properly assigned. What remains: a couple of simple editorial tasks (make sure dynamics and tempi are correctly notated, and that all lyrics are using the same font) and a pass to check the singability of each part (change that it's in range, has no awkward jumps, and that the syllables of the lyrics fall reasonably in the contrapuntal sections).

Let's hear it for long weekends! :-)
rhu: (Default)
KabShab IV is properly 6-voxed. PDF on the website is updated; MP3 didn't change enough to recompile.

Onward!
rhu: (Default)
KabShab IV is properly 6-voxed. PDF on the website is updated; MP3 didn't change enough to recompile.

Onward!

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Andrew M. Greene

January 2013

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