rhu: (Default)

For me, the most inspiring moment was near the end of the debate, when Rep. Rob Andrews (D-NJ) rose and said:

Mr. Speaker, our friends on the other side of the aisle have asked frequently tonight what kind of country are we. They've asked exactly the right question. Tomorrow when a person is denied a job because she has breast cancer or is charged higher premiums because he has asthma, what kind of country will we be? Tomorrow when a senior citizen has enough money in her checking account to pay the utility bill or her prescription bill but not both, what kind of country will we be? When a person who tonight is scrubbing floors or pumping gas or waiting on tables tomorrow tries to go to buy a health insurance policy for herself or her children, what kind of country will we be?

For Social Security, we gave decency for seniors. In Medicare, we gave compassion for seniors. In the Civil Rights Act, we gave equality for all Americans. Tonight, we will give justice and decency. That's the kind of country that we will be.

rhu: (Default)

For me, the most inspiring moment was near the end of the debate, when Rep. Rob Andrews (D-NJ) rose and said:

Mr. Speaker, our friends on the other side of the aisle have asked frequently tonight what kind of country are we. They've asked exactly the right question. Tomorrow when a person is denied a job because she has breast cancer or is charged higher premiums because he has asthma, what kind of country will we be? Tomorrow when a senior citizen has enough money in her checking account to pay the utility bill or her prescription bill but not both, what kind of country will we be? When a person who tonight is scrubbing floors or pumping gas or waiting on tables tomorrow tries to go to buy a health insurance policy for herself or her children, what kind of country will we be?

For Social Security, we gave decency for seniors. In Medicare, we gave compassion for seniors. In the Civil Rights Act, we gave equality for all Americans. Tonight, we will give justice and decency. That's the kind of country that we will be.

QOTD

Sep. 28th, 2009 07:58 pm
rhu: (torah)
Quote of the day: Teo Dagi, in his dvar Torah this morning, observed:

After all that, Jonah gets to Nineveh and does the least he can get away with and still fulfill God's command: "Forty days and Nineveh is overturned!"

That's not a prophecy, that's a tweet.

QOTD

Sep. 28th, 2009 07:58 pm
rhu: (torah)
Quote of the day: Teo Dagi, in his dvar Torah this morning, observed:

After all that, Jonah gets to Nineveh and does the least he can get away with and still fulfill God's command: "Forty days and Nineveh is overturned!"

That's not a prophecy, that's a tweet.
rhu: (Default)
Keyboarding at 10,000 or more characters per hour is bound to result in appallingly bad composition, and an incentive system which encourages this by increasing the weekly wage packet in inverse ratio to the quality of the output, is not only pernicious, but for the keyboard operator, totally demoralizing.

And typsetting standards will continue to decline unless the typographer, who has taken over duties formerly the craftsman-compositor’s (the composition or arrangement of types as distinct from the setting of them), is prepared to do constant battle for high standards of design & of workmanship.

— Geoffrey Dowding,
Finer Points in the Spacing and Arrangement of Type, 1966

rhu: (Default)
Keyboarding at 10,000 or more characters per hour is bound to result in appallingly bad composition, and an incentive system which encourages this by increasing the weekly wage packet in inverse ratio to the quality of the output, is not only pernicious, but for the keyboard operator, totally demoralizing.

And typsetting standards will continue to decline unless the typographer, who has taken over duties formerly the craftsman-compositor’s (the composition or arrangement of types as distinct from the setting of them), is prepared to do constant battle for high standards of design & of workmanship.

— Geoffrey Dowding,
Finer Points in the Spacing and Arrangement of Type, 1966

rhu: (Default)
From today's NYT:

“As much as I love Beethoven and Mozart, the greatest is Bach,” [Andras Schiff] said of the composer with whom he communes each day. “And they would be the first to agree. For me, to play Bach is a matter of hygiene. It’s like taking a shower.”
rhu: (Default)
From today's NYT:

“As much as I love Beethoven and Mozart, the greatest is Bach,” [Andras Schiff] said of the composer with whom he communes each day. “And they would be the first to agree. For me, to play Bach is a matter of hygiene. It’s like taking a shower.”
rhu: (Default)

Thomas Quasthoff, in an interview in yesterday's New York Times Magazine:

"If as a singer you are not able to make a psychic striptease, you should do something else."
rhu: (Default)

Thomas Quasthoff, in an interview in yesterday's New York Times Magazine:

"If as a singer you are not able to make a psychic striptease, you should do something else."

Profile

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Andrew M. Greene

January 2013

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